Dispelling Pregnancy Myths

Dr. Kristen Sharp, UW Health obstetrician gynecologist, realizes there is a lot of misinformation about pregnancy. She co-hosted a Facebook Live session recently to set the record straight on many of the common questions women have. Below are her insights, many of which also are addressed during CenteringPregnancy group prenatal care sessions.

Watch for a future post from her co-host, Dr. Jasmine Zapata, pediatrician, who covered common questions about newborn care.

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Winter Safety Reminder

For a pediatrician from California, Wisconsin winters are one thing I don’t think I’ll ever get used to. If your family does decide to venture out into the cold, here are a few important things to keep in mind.

Winter Warmth

Keep your infants and children warm by dressing them in layers. How do you know if your baby is warm enough? Generally, a good rule of thumb for older babies and children is to dress in one more layer than what an adult would need for adequate warmth.

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Chronic Headaches in Kids

Chronic headaches in children are common and only very rarely signal a more serious problem.

But for worried parents – concerned about managing their child’s pain and ensuring they can still participate in school and normal daily activities – dealing with it all can be… well, a big headache.

It’s often difficult to pinpoint a single cause, but most chronic headaches in kids can be tied back to some key triggers, says Cassie Meffert, a physician assistant in UW Health’s Pediatric Neurology Headache Clinic.

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Deck the Halls Safely This Season

The holidays are a time for spending with family and friends, not rushing to the emergency room. Whether you’re preparing to decorate your own home, or going to visit relatives or friends, keep the following tips in mind to help everyone have a merry and safe holiday.

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If you decorate a tree, avoid these top decorating mistakes:

  • Decorate with children in mind. Do not put ornaments that have small parts or metal hooks, or look like food or candy, on the lower branches where small children can reach them.
  • Keep the glass ornaments off the tree until children are older as they can be easily broken.

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The Common Cold and Your Child

It’s called the “common” cold with good reason; it’s the most common infectious disease in the United States. The common cold responsible for more school absences than any other illness. Most kids under age five can have 6-8 colds per year and the symptoms can last seven to fourteen days.

This contagious infection of the upper airway (nose, throat, and sinuses) is caused by a virus. A cold virus is spread from a sick person to others by sneezing or coughing or contact with the hands or mouth. A cold virus can live on toys, phones, door knobs, tables, and other objects for up to three hours and transfer to a child’s hands. The virus gets on a child’s hands and is transferred to the nose, mouth, or eyes by normal face touching habits. Read more

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