Breastmilk Oversupply – Is This a Problem?

You may be aware of the benefits of breastfeeding and/or breastmilk for both the baby and the mother. These include, but are not limited to fewer and shorter illnesses for the baby and reduced cancer risk for moms. The American Academy of Pediatrics “recommends exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” Most mothers in the US attempt to breastfeed and one of the most common hurdles mothers face is low milk supply. The opposite of low milk supply, oversupply can also be a problem. One may wonder why oversupply is a problem, more of a good thing is usually good, right?  Read more

Meet Lydia

When parents learn their child will be born with a cleft lip and/or palate, they are often concerned and even scared. And it’s natural to experience fear – fear over what it will mean for their new child’s health and even her or his future well-being. During what are often emotional discussions, I try to answer all their questions and above all, reassure them that we can help. An extensive health care team – from surgeons and dentists to speech pathologists and genetic experts – will be with them every step of the way.

And there is someone else that I hope can help in the process – hearing from one of my patients, Lydia.
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Off to Big Kids’ School: Preparing for Kindergarten

“I’m a little graduate

Aren’t you proud of me?

I know my numbers and ABCs

I made lots of friends and had fun, too

Now, I’m off to big kids’ school!”

The sweet little ditty my son Benjamin and his classmates sang at junior-K graduation, to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot,” was enough to turn this mama into an emotional puddle. (And don’t even get me started on the caps and gowns.)

I blinked, and five years just flew by. Our baby boy is (proudly) off to kindergarten.

Soon, we’ll be scouring Target and Amazon to check off our list of supplies, and loading up the Kylo Ren backpack. As summer begins and we prepare for The Big Day around the bend, two big questions loom in my heart and my mind: Read more

Teen Health and Housing After Aging Out of Foster Care

Teen Health and Housing After Aging Out of Foster CareFoster care has been a frequent topic of discussion lately; there have been heart breaking-stories (like foster families helping ease anxiety of immigrant children placed in foster care while separated from parents), as well as heart-warming stories like the clothing store in Florida who has special shopping hours just for children in foster care. There are many reports available about the health of children while in foster care, but what happens to the teenager who “ages out” of the foster care system?

Teens who are in the foster care system face challenging social stressors after leaving foster care when they turn 18 years old. Every year 24,000 US foster adolescents age out of foster care. The period after leaving foster care can be a rough transition. These teens are at high risk of bouncing from one living situation to another, which is termed “housing instability.” It’s been estimated that more than 35% of them may experience homelessness after leaving foster care. Read more

How to Prevent and Treat a Torn ACL in Kids

An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be frustrating for adults, but it’s often devastating for young athletes who are eager to rejoin their friends on the playing field. It’s becoming more common for active kids to tear this important ligament that controls the stability and mobility of the knee, and the recovery process can take up to a year or more.

“The highest risk category is kids who are going through growth quickly because their bodies have elongated quickly and their bodies act as levers,” explains Dan Enz, PT, SCS, LAT, a physical therapist with the UW Health Sports Rehabilitation Department. “And with teens, who are often more active in competition and playing sports year-round, their bodies are sometimes growing faster than they can control. That lever puts increased force through their knee and puts them at greater risk.”

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