Blog posts by UW Health Kids

Michael and “Shakey” Make Great Partners in the Fight Against Cystic Fibrosis

When she learned that her son had cystic fibrosis, mom didn’t know much about the disease. Today, the Jones family advocates for finding a cure. 

Traci Jones vividly recalls the 9 a.m. phone call from her pediatrician’s office just nine days after her third child, Michael, was born in 2014.

“We have Michael’s newborn screening results,” said the clinician. “We need to see you at 12:30 this afternoon.”

Accompanied by her mother, a nurse, Traci recalls very little from the 40-minute visit with her pediatrician.

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Daxton’s Heart was in the Right Place

Amber Noggle was 20 weeks pregnant when she went in for what she expected to be a routine ultrasound.

Once the scan was complete, Amber got nervous as several more medical staff entered the room. The next words she and her husband, Dustin, heard changed everything immediately.

“We need to talk. It’s about your baby boy’s heart.”

Suddenly, Amber learned that the baby she was carrying had a rare, complex heart defect called tetralogy of fallot with pulmonary atresia. Babies with this defect have five abnormalities: completely obstructed blood flow from the heart to the lungs; a hole between the heart’s lower chambers; an overriding aorta; a thickened right ventricle; and abnormal pulmonary arteries. Major surgery is typically performed not long after the baby’s birth.

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Raising Kids Who Love Nature

For thousands of years, humans have recognized the soul-calming effect of time spent in nature. But between the lure of screen time and frenzied schedules packed with organized sports and other activities, it can be difficult to get kids outside to just be.

Only 51 percent of preschool kids go out outside once a day to walk or play, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which recommends outdoor playtime in its recent report titled “The Power of Play.” Even short periods of outdoor time can help kids get more active, reduce anxiety, improve mood and concentration, and sleep better at night.

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“Beads of Courage” Inspires Many Families

Families who have a baby being cared for in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) typically spend a lot of time in the hospital – an average of 24 days at American Family Children’s Hospital.

Typically, there are many steps along the journey of care before a baby is healthy enough to go home or return to the local NICU to feed and grow. Understandably, the days and nights often become a blur, making it hard for families to remember each stop along the journey of care.

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