The “Finding Active Things Kids Like To Do” Challenge

A recent study out of Scotland found that after the age of 7, activity levels go down for both boys and girls. When Randy Clark, manager of the Pediatric Fitness Clinic read about it, he wasn’t at all surprised.

“Finding ways to engage kids in physical activity is a huge challenge I face as a parent and in my work at the Pediatric Fitness Clinic,” he says.  Clark, whose children are 12 and 14 years old, shares that part of the problem, in his opinion, is the increasing time we spend looking at screens.  He shares that as part of the ‘baby boomer outside generation’, fun included wiffle ball, touch football, capture the flag, kick-the-can and skating at the local rink. Now kids are growing up in a very different world filled with cell phones, iPods, personal computers and hand held devices. For him, while they are wonderful advancements in technology, they have led to an increasing amount of sedentary screen time.”

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High School Athletes: Staying Safe in the Heat

Teen Playing TennisMany high school athletes have already returned to sports camps in preparation for the fall season. The challenge is that during July, August and even September, we can experience some of the hottest days of the year. With the high temps, athletes need to be aware of how environmental factors like heat and humidity can affect their health and athletic performance.

How Heat Affects the Body

As heat and humidity rise our body has to work harder to cool off. Our bodies cool primarily through the evaporation of sweat. When temperatures rise, we produce more sweat to cool the body. As the humidity rises, it becomes more difficult for the sweat to evaporate hampering the ability of the body to cool off. It is one reason why it is important for athletes to drink fluids during the day and at practice to stay adequately hydrated, and to modify practice routines based on weather conditions.

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Get Fit Together Family Activity Guide (Giveaway)

This giveaway is no longer accepting entries. Congratulations to our winner Shelly

We know that children are little mimics – they will copy behaviors that they observe and repeat words that they hear (nearly every parent can attest to this with stories of awkward situations involving particular word choices not appropriate for 5-year-olds to utter). So if mom and dad relax in front of the TV after dinner, chances are that’s going to be the preference for the kids as well. But, if mom and dad instead say it’s time to do something fun together after dinner, that helps create an environment where activity is normal and encouraged.

Family Hiking in the Woods

While it can be hard with busy lifestyle – whether it’s work, or scheduled activities like music lessons or sports – you really have to make the time, otherwise it’s too easy to put things off until the next day. Block time on the weekend – whether it’s an hour or half the day – and do something fun as a family. Go for a hike, go for a bike ride on a trail, go geocaching, discover a new park – just go. Do something. You can even let the kids decide – chose between a hike or bike ride. Go for a walk after dinner. Just get out together.

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Athletic Performance and Conditioning for the Dancer

While many think of dancing as an art form, there’s no question it is a sport with rigorous physical demands. Formal training has often focused on the technical and aesthetic demands of the sport, but recent research suggests that traditional training has only limited focus on the aerobic and cardiovascular aspects.

It may be hard to believe, but dancers often demonstrate fitness levels similar to those of healthy sedentary individuals. With the reduced levels of overall physical fitness, there are often higher levels of injuries in dancers. To help reduce the risk of injury, and improve movement efficiency, performance excellence and longevity in the field, dancers should consider a training program that includes cardiovascular endurance or aerobic exercise, and strength and power training.

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Put down the screen, and put on your shoes!

Screen Free Week 2014With all the technological advances, easily connecting people to the web, it’s no surprise that many people are spending too much time with screens. Kids may spend precious hours after school and on the weekends on the TV, computer, tablet and phone screens, rather than playing, socializing and being physically active with peers or siblings, or even sleeping.

The American Academy of Pediatrics highly recommends no more than two hours of screen time per day. The content should be educational, non-violent and supervised by parents. It is important for parents to keep this in mind and track their kids’ screen time, then encourage activity when their time is up.

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