Appetite Ups and Downs- Nutrition and Growth Spurts

Puberty-related growth spurts can be expected somewhere between ages 10-14 for girls and 10-16 for boys. Growth spurts are a period of rapid gain in height, often accompanied by increased hunger and fatigue, as the body uses more energy to build tissue. It’s common for parents to be surprised at their child’s sudden spike in appetite and wonder “should I let him keep eating?” as the child asks for a bowl of cereal 1 hour after eating 2 large helpings of dinner.

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The Kids’ Menu May Not Be So Kid-Friendly After All

A recent article hit our news feeds this last week highlighting the need to pay closer attention to our children’s plates when dining out. The research team called restaurateurs to action and encouraged a revamp of children’s menus at favored chains to provide entrees, sides, desserts and beverages that fall in-line with a child’s energy needs versus their desires. These modifications would allow youth the opportunity to select any item from the children’s menu and award parents the satisfaction that their child would not be exceeding their needs. But, as it stands children’s menus are not so kid-friendly when it comes to providing age-appropriate portions.

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Keep Food and Media Separate

Keep Food and Media SeparateTurn back the clock to when you were 3 years old. Sit down to a “satisfying” snack; half banana, sliced cheese and crackers with ice water before snuggling up on a comfortable couch to watch your favorite show- Elmo’s World. You notice two bowls in front of the couch: one filled with bear-shaped graham crackers and the other with corn chips. Throughout the 14-minute show, nine commercials appear advertising corn chips. Despite feeling satisfied, you naturally indulge in the snacks in front of you. Which snack did you eat more of?

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Curbing Halloween Candy Consumption

Halloween CandyA quick perusal of the Internet’s take on strategies parents can use to limit the candy carnage on Halloween frequently invokes words like “horror” and a variety of tortured takes on “trick-or-treat.”

But UW Health registered dietitian Cassie Vanderwall sees Halloween as an opportunity to teach children valuable lessons about restraint and moderation.

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