Pumping for Your Baby

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends “exclusive breastfeeding for about six months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for one year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” There are times when mothers are not able to directly breastfeed their infants. This can be by choice, separation of mom and infant or medical needs of either mom or infant. Some mothers will then choose to pump their milk to provide to their baby. It is the next best way for babies to get their nutrition.

Here are some tips for pumping for your baby:

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Sandbox Safety

This may be one of those “I’d rather not know what’s really in there” moments. But despite the appeal of sandboxes, those communal gathering spots of the 4-year-old set may not be as innocent as they appear.

Like swimming pools – which we enter with a certain amount of forcing ourselves not to think about what’s really in that water – the shared sand space contains the residue of all who have entered it. That includes bacteria, parasites and other infectious germs carried by kids and – depending on the location of the sand – animals. The difference is that the sandboxes don’t have chlorine or other agents to help kill off some of the germs.

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Parent-to-Parent Peer Pressure

It’s a common scenario – the kids come home from school one day and start talking about something they want. Maybe it’s a new video game, a new phone, or to go on a trip to some far locale. And inevitably it includes the phrase, “but everyone else has one, and I’m the only one who doesn’t!” (or something similar).

As a parent it can be difficult – after all, we are all familiar with feeling left out. And perhaps we’re even a bit worried on how we’ll be judged by other parents. Social media can increase that pressure, too – pictures of seemingly perfect birthday parties with coordinating colors and cute themes; smiling family vacation photos from Disney World; presents overflowing from beneath the Christmas tree; endless photos of successful sports activities. It just doesn’t seem to end.

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Fracture Season: Preventing Broken Bones in Kids

In some parts of the country, people say there are really only two seasons: winter and construction.

Add a third – “fracture season,” say experts in children’s health at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wis.

We’re in the heart of it right now. Warm spring temperatures and the end of school combine to send thousands of kids into backyards and onto playgrounds, where they’re breaking their bones at startling rates-on rollerblades, on bikes, playground equipment and trampolines.

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Appetite Ups and Downs- Nutrition and Growth Spurts

Puberty-related growth spurts can be expected somewhere between ages 10-14 for girls and 10-16 for boys. Growth spurts are a period of rapid gain in height, often accompanied by increased hunger and fatigue, as the body uses more energy to build tissue. It’s common for parents to be surprised at their child’s sudden spike in appetite and wonder “should I let him keep eating?” as the child asks for a bowl of cereal 1 hour after eating 2 large helpings of dinner.

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