Parent-to-Parent Peer Pressure

It’s a common scenario – the kids come home from school one day and start talking about something they want. Maybe it’s a new video game, a new phone, or to go on a trip to some far locale. And inevitably it includes the phrase, “but everyone else has one, and I’m the only one who doesn’t!” (or something similar).

As a parent it can be difficult – after all, we are all familiar with feeling left out. And perhaps we’re even a bit worried on how we’ll be judged by other parents. Social media can increase that pressure, too – pictures of seemingly perfect birthday parties with coordinating colors and cute themes; smiling family vacation photos from Disney World; presents overflowing from beneath the Christmas tree; endless photos of successful sports activities. It just doesn’t seem to end.

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Fracture Season: Preventing Broken Bones in Kids

In some parts of the country, people say there are really only two seasons: winter and construction.

Add a third – “fracture season,” say experts in children’s health at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wis.

We’re in the heart of it right now. Warm spring temperatures and the end of school combine to send thousands of kids into backyards and onto playgrounds, where they’re breaking their bones at startling rates-on rollerblades, on bikes, playground equipment and trampolines.

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Appetite Ups and Downs- Nutrition and Growth Spurts

Puberty-related growth spurts can be expected somewhere between ages 10-14 for girls and 10-16 for boys. Growth spurts are a period of rapid gain in height, often accompanied by increased hunger and fatigue, as the body uses more energy to build tissue. It’s common for parents to be surprised at their child’s sudden spike in appetite and wonder “should I let him keep eating?” as the child asks for a bowl of cereal 1 hour after eating 2 large helpings of dinner.

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What to Do When Kids Lie

What to do when kids lieMany of us remember our parents’ reaction when we were caught in a lie or remember when our children told us a lie.  It often comes as a shock to parents. The reality is that all children lie at some point. It’s a normal part of a development. As the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) explains, the act of lying demonstrates that their conscience is working. While it can be upsetting when kids lie or stretch the truth, the reasons they do so vary by age. And, how we react can make a big difference on their future behavior.

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Screen Time Stress

Many parents may have experienced the challenges of getting kids to turn off electronic devices when time is up, and for some families it can even turn into a struggle with kids refusing to stop. Dr. Marcia Slattery, UW Health child and adolescent psychiatrist and director of the UW Anxiety and Stress Disorders Program, sees many families for whom screen time has become a “battle.”

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