The Common Cold and Your Child

It’s called the “common” cold with good reason; it’s the most common infectious disease in the United States. The common cold responsible for more school absences than any other illness. Most kids under age five can have 6-8 colds per year and the symptoms can last seven to fourteen days.

This contagious infection of the upper airway (nose, throat, and sinuses) is caused by a virus. A cold virus is spread from a sick person to others by sneezing or coughing or contact with the hands or mouth. A cold virus can live on toys, phones, door knobs, tables, and other objects for up to three hours and transfer to a child’s hands. The virus gets on a child’s hands and is transferred to the nose, mouth, or eyes by normal face touching habits. Read more

Tip for Stopping Nosebleeds: Lean Forward, Not Backward

Tilt your head back to stop a bloody nose? That old-fashioned advice for kids is just plain wrong. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of misinformation on how to stop this common childhood malady. Dr. Diane Heatley, medical director of American Family Children’s Hospital, says old-time remedies like lying down or holding the head back will not work, because children’s nosebleeds usually start in blood vessels in the front of the nose.

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Parent’s Guide to Pain Prevention

Does this situation sound familiar?

“You have a doctor appointment for a check-up today after school.”

“Am I going to get a shot? I hate shots. I don’t think I want to go to the doctor today.”

Before the age of 2 years old, the CDC recommends children receive 24 immunizations. While this sounds like a lot of shots, and it is, immunizations are one of the Public Health initiatives that have resulted prevention of the most deaths and disability early in life.

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My Shadow

On any given day, UW Health maternal-fetal medicine physician Katie Antony is helping women: helping an expectant mom navigate a complicated pregnancy, or in the delivery room bringing a new baby into the world. She is also a mother of two: daughter Tara, almost three, and baby son Linus .

She can now add “children’s book author” to the list.

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