Chronic Headaches in Kids

Chronic headaches in children are common and only very rarely signal a more serious problem.

But for worried parents – concerned about managing their child’s pain and ensuring they can still participate in school and normal daily activities – dealing with it all can be… well, a big headache.

It’s often difficult to pinpoint a single cause, but most chronic headaches in kids can be tied back to some key triggers, says Cassie Meffert, a physician assistant in UW Health’s Pediatric Neurology Headache Clinic.

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Deck the Halls Safely This Season

The holidays are a time for spending with family and friends, not rushing to the emergency room. Whether you’re preparing to decorate your own home, or going to visit relatives or friends, keep the following tips in mind to help everyone have a merry and safe holiday.


If you decorate a tree, avoid these top decorating mistakes:

  • Decorate with children in mind. Do not put ornaments that have small parts or metal hooks, or look like food or candy, on the lower branches where small children can reach them.
  • Keep the glass ornaments off the tree until children are older as they can be easily broken.

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The Common Cold and Your Child

It’s called the “common” cold with good reason; it’s the most common infectious disease in the United States. The common cold responsible for more school absences than any other illness. Most kids under age five can have 6-8 colds per year and the symptoms can last seven to fourteen days.

This contagious infection of the upper airway (nose, throat, and sinuses) is caused by a virus. A cold virus is spread from a sick person to others by sneezing or coughing or contact with the hands or mouth. A cold virus can live on toys, phones, door knobs, tables, and other objects for up to three hours and transfer to a child’s hands. The virus gets on a child’s hands and is transferred to the nose, mouth, or eyes by normal face touching habits. Read more

World AIDS Day 2017

The start of December brings about many things, including World AIDS Day.  This year’s theme is about ending the stigma of those living with HIV/AIDS (follow along on Twitter at #LetsEndIt). There is still a lot of misinformation about HIV/AIDS – remember a couple months ago when a Georgia state representative (and former anesthesiologist) recommended quarantining those with HIV to curtail the spread of the virus? Stigma and discrimination are some of the biggest barriers to HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support. Specifically, research has shown that stigma and discrimination undermine HIV prevention efforts by making people afraid to seek HIV information, testing, and services to reduce their risk of infection.

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