Breastmilk Oversupply – Is This a Problem?

You may be aware of the benefits of breastfeeding and/or breastmilk for both the baby and the mother. These include, but are not limited to fewer and shorter illnesses for the baby and reduced cancer risk for moms. The American Academy of Pediatrics “recommends exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” Most mothers in the US attempt to breastfeed and one of the most common hurdles mothers face is low milk supply. The opposite of low milk supply, oversupply can also be a problem. One may wonder why oversupply is a problem, more of a good thing is usually good, right?  Read more

Pumping for Your Baby

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends “exclusive breastfeeding for about six months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for one year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” There are times when mothers are not able to directly breastfeed their infants. This can be by choice, separation of mom and infant or medical needs of either mom or infant. Some mothers will then choose to pump their milk to provide to their baby. It is the next best way for babies to get their nutrition.

Here are some tips for pumping for your baby:

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New Parents and Sleep: What to Expect

Newborn Sleep, What to Expect

Ah…sleep. It seems so precious and limited when babies are young. New parents quickly learn not to take a good nights’ sleep for granted. When should breastfed babies be expected to sleep throughout the night?

Sleep is a work in progress during the first year of a baby’s life. There is no easy answer.

The First Month

In the first few weeks after birth, babies almost always fall asleep at the end of nursing. Their tummies are full, they just worked for their meal by actively nursing, and they are warm and cozy in mom’s arms. Who wouldn’t take a snooze after this?

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