Breastmilk Oversupply – Is This a Problem?

You may be aware of the benefits of breastfeeding and/or breastmilk for both the baby and the mother. These include, but are not limited to fewer and shorter illnesses for the baby and reduced cancer risk for moms. The American Academy of Pediatrics “recommends exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” Most mothers in the US attempt to breastfeed and one of the most common hurdles mothers face is low milk supply. The opposite of low milk supply, oversupply can also be a problem. One may wonder why oversupply is a problem, more of a good thing is usually good, right?  Read more

Soothing a Teething Baby

Soothing a Teething Baby

Soothing a Teething BabyYou’ve just gotten your baby to bed. Relieved, you sit down to read a book or head to the laundry room to get clothes out of the washing machine. After what feels like no time at all, your baby wakes up—again—fussy and miserable. What could be the cause? … Teething.

Caring for a teething baby can be a challenge. Babies tend to be fussy as their teeth come in. Teeth usually come in when a child is between 4-7 months old. Gum irritation, irritability and drooling are the most common symptoms.

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Parent’s Guide to Pain Prevention

Does this situation sound familiar?

“You have a doctor appointment for a check-up today after school.”

“Am I going to get a shot? I hate shots. I don’t think I want to go to the doctor today.”

Before the age of 2 years old, the CDC recommends children receive 24 immunizations. While this sounds like a lot of shots, and it is, immunizations are one of the Public Health initiatives that have resulted prevention of the most deaths and disability early in life.

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Iron Deficiency

Iron deficiency is the most common micro-nutrient deficiency in the world and the largest group at risk includes pregnant women and young children. Iron is very important in child development, especially in the brain. In fact, iron deficiency during infancy can negatively impact thinking and emotions, behavior, movement, vision and hearing, learning and even memory. The younger the child, the greater the risk these effects are long-term. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends universal screening of iron deficiency at 12 months of age. Read more

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