Tip for Stopping Nosebleeds: Lean Forward, Not Backward

Tilt your head back to stop a bloody nose? That old-fashioned advice for kids is just plain wrong. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of misinformation on how to stop this common childhood malady. Dr. Diane Heatley, medical director of American Family Children’s Hospital, says old-time remedies like lying down or holding the head back will not work, because children’s nosebleeds usually start in blood vessels in the front of the nose.

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Parent’s Guide to Pain Prevention

Does this situation sound familiar?

“You have a doctor appointment for a check-up today after school.”

“Am I going to get a shot? I hate shots. I don’t think I want to go to the doctor today.”

Before the age of 2 years old, the CDC recommends children receive 24 immunizations. While this sounds like a lot of shots, and it is, immunizations are one of the Public Health initiatives that have resulted prevention of the most deaths and disability early in life.

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Sandbox Safety

This may be one of those “I’d rather not know what’s really in there” moments. But despite the appeal of sandboxes, those communal gathering spots of the 4-year-old set may not be as innocent as they appear.

Like swimming pools – which we enter with a certain amount of forcing ourselves not to think about what’s really in that water – the shared sand space contains the residue of all who have entered it. That includes bacteria, parasites and other infectious germs carried by kids and – depending on the location of the sand – animals. The difference is that the sandboxes don’t have chlorine or other agents to help kill off some of the germs.

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Fighting Hunger this Summer

One in six children and one in nine adults in Dane County have food insecurity, according to the national hunger-relief organization Feeding America.

The United States Department of Agriculture defines food security as having access, at all times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. Families may be considered food-insecure if they have anxiety about having enough food in the house, have to buy food of low quality or have to eat less or less often.

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