Fracture Season: Preventing Broken Bones in Kids

In some parts of the country, people say there are really only two seasons: winter and construction.

Add a third – “fracture season,” say experts in children’s health at American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wis.

We’re in the heart of it right now. Warm spring temperatures and the end of school combine to send thousands of kids into backyards and onto playgrounds, where they’re breaking their bones at startling rates-on rollerblades, on bikes, playground equipment and trampolines.

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Screen Time Stress

Many parents may have experienced the challenges of getting kids to turn off electronic devices when time is up, and for some families it can even turn into a struggle with kids refusing to stop. Dr. Marcia Slattery, UW Health child and adolescent psychiatrist and director of the UW Anxiety and Stress Disorders Program, sees many families for whom screen time has become a “battle.”

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The Kids’ Menu May Not Be So Kid-Friendly After All

A recent article hit our news feeds this last week highlighting the need to pay closer attention to our children’s plates when dining out. The research team called restaurateurs to action and encouraged a revamp of children’s menus at favored chains to provide entrees, sides, desserts and beverages that fall in-line with a child’s energy needs versus their desires. These modifications would allow youth the opportunity to select any item from the children’s menu and award parents the satisfaction that their child would not be exceeding their needs. But, as it stands children’s menus are not so kid-friendly when it comes to providing age-appropriate portions.

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Soothing a Teething Baby

TeethingYou’ve just gotten your baby to bed. Relieved, you sit down to read a book or head to the laundry room to get clothes out of the washing machine. After what feels like no time at all, your baby wakes up—again—fussy and miserable. What could be the cause? … Teething.

Caring for a teething baby can be a challenge. Babies tend to be fussy as their teeth come in. Teeth usually come in when a child is between 4-7 months old. Gum irritation, irritability and drooling are the most common symptoms.

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